Other platelet tests

 
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on StumbleUpon

Plateletcrit

The plateletcrit (reported as a %) is analogous to the hematocrit and reflects the mass of platelets. This result is not usually reported on most hemograms and is infrequently used in laboratories. It has been mainly used to show that dogs with inherited macrothrombocytopenia have normal platelet mass (Tvedten et al., 2012Kelley et al., 2014).

Method of measurement

The plateletcrit can be obtained in two ways as indicated below. Results from the two methods do not always correlate, with laser-based method yielding lower plateletcrit than the buffy coat method (Tvedten et al., 2012). At this stage, it is unclear which is the superior method.
  • Direct measurement: Buffy coat-based analyzers directly measure the plateletcrit (e.g. VetAutoread™)
  • Calculated value: Laser-based optical analyzers calculate a plateletcrit as follows:

Plateletcrit (%) = (MPV x PLT count) ÷ 1000

Test interpretation

A reference interval of 0.129 -0.403% has been established for the plateletcrit (Kelley et al., 2014). Cavalier King Charles Spaniels with inherited macrothrombocytopenia usually (but not always) have a normal plateletcrit, because platelets are uniformly large and their large size makes up for the mild to moderate thrombocytopenia (Tvedten et al., 2012, Kelley et al., 2014). This may explain the lack of bleeding tendencies in these dogs (although platelet counts are rarely below 30 thou/uL), because they have a normal “mass” of platelets. In contrast, Greyhounds can also have lower platelet counts than other breeds of dogs and also have lower plateletcrits. The diagnostic utility of plateletcrit in dogs with acquired causes of thrombocytopenia is currently unknown. It is likely that storage will falsely increase the plateletcrit (platelets swell with storage, increasing the MPV). It is possible that the plateletcrit may help discriminate a true thrombocytopenia and an artifactual thrombocytopenia as a consequence of platelet clumping, however this remains to be tested.

Mean platelet component

This is a measure of the granularity of platelets and can be a reflection of platelet activation. Unactivated platelets contain numerous cytoplasmic granules (alpha granules, dense bodies). When platelets become activated, they degranulate. The granule content of platelets can be assessed using laser optical-based hematologic analyzers reported as the mean platelet component or MPC (in g/dL).

Method of measurement

Laser-based platelet analysis

Laser-based platelet analysis

As platelets pass through a laser, they scatter the laser light in a forward and side direction (low and high angle scatter, respectively). Side (high angle) scatter is a measure of the internal complexity of the platelet, which is largely governed by the number of granules and is called the platelet component (PC). Forward (low angle) scatter is a measure of platelet volume. The analyzer provides a mean for both of these values, i.e. mean platelet volume (MPV) and mean platelet component (MPC). A coefficient of variation of the MPC (mean/standard deviation of the PC) or platelet component distribution width (PCDW) is also provided. However, these values are only valid if the platelets are adequately sphered while they pass through the laser, which is not always the case, regardless of anticoagulant (EDTA is required for adequate sphering). This limits the diagnostic utility of these measurements in animals (since platelets are frequently not sufficiently sphered for analysis). Hence these values are not reported on hemograms and are not used that frequently within the laboratory either.

Test interpretation

If sufficiently sphered, a low MPC indicates that platelets are less granular. This can be due to activation (whether occurring as a real in vivo finding or an artifact of sample collection or storage) or swelling of platelets due to uptake of water (an artifact of storage). Changes in the MPC should correspond to visual features of degranulation in a blood smear (less granular or “gray” platelets). A high MPC is of no diagnostic relevance.
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on StumbleUpon
Top